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Dual Disc upgrade

Discussion in 'Motorcycle Tech Talk' started by Robert Kirk, Feb 8, 2017.

  1. Robert Kirk

    Robert Kirk Member

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    Wanting some info on where to find a single or pair of sliders, or possibly the whole triple tree down front end. I am 1st going to try a complete fluid flush and fill with Dot 5, and put on new brake lines, and the Lyndyll Z-Plus brake pads on my stock rotors. I just don't like the brakes on my FLSTF. I know its a Harley and they don't stop as well as asian cruisers I have been used to. I just am not comfortable yet on it because of this. Anyway, I was at a swap meet last week and there was all kinds of sliders, and fork assemblies, etc. for really good prices. If I choose to convert to dual discs on the front, other than a bigger fluid reservoir, possibly redrilling or making a front fender mounting bracket, and a new wheel that accepts 2 discs, what should I be looking for in the slider department? Would be nice to just find a right side slider that matches the left, with the mounting bracket for caliper. But in my research, didn't find a company that makes one. Oh yea, bike is a 1996 FLSTF (Fat Boy). Any help appreciated. I am hoping the new lines, pads, fluid will improve things enough to not have to go through this $$$ + hassle. I know, my current forks / wheels take 3/4" axle, but there are many 1" wheels out there to work with 1" axle holed fork sliders.
  2. Fatboy128

    Fatboy128 Well-Known Member

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    I own a 2005 Fatboy. It was my first Harley. I too was disappointed in the front brake lack of grab. After 40,000+ miles I am satisfied with the single rotor. I replaced the pads like you plan and I installed a floating rotor from Harley. I guess I either got used to it, built stronger right hand or the change I made worked. It's still not as strong as the dual rotor nikes but I do ride hard and all is fine.


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  3. Red Rider

    Red Rider Well-Known Member

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    If your FLSTF has the stock 2-piston caliper, you can upgrade to a 4-piston for a good bit less $ & hassle than going dual disc, and it really will make a difference. Take a look at the 4-piston options out there before laying down the dough for a dual disc modification.
    Fatboy128 likes this.
  4. hotroadking

    hotroadking Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I think he's got a single piston front caliper?

    Agree it would be easier to find a set of newer softail lowers
    that someone swapped out for chrome and a newer caliper with MC
    might have to change the axel out but you can simply put in new wheel
    bearings and get rid of the old two piece front bearings to fit your original
    wheel.

    Or you can get a PM 4 or 6 piston front caliper, this is what I ran
    on my Heritage with a 124, the stock stuff wasn't good enough to
    keep up with that power, a 6 piston on an otherwise stock bike
    will be more than plenty.
    Red Rider likes this.
  5. Red Rider

    Red Rider Well-Known Member

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    Really, getting a high-performance single caliper with four or six pistons is better than adding another disc if you're still using two single or even dual piston calipers. Note that the additional disc/caliper means more forward/total weight. Also, for less costs, you can probably get a real fancy-lookin' single unit that works great, too.
  6. Lucifer

    Lucifer Well-Known Member

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    Those single puck Evo calipers will only stop the bike if they come off and get caught in the wheel.lol Even adding another disc won't help much if adding another Evo type single piston caliper,then you'd have to go with an 11/16" bore MC for dual discs.
    A braided line and a 4 piston caliper will give you much improved braking with the single disc set up and would be comparable in price to going dual disc,with less work.
    Red Rider likes this.
  7. Robert Kirk

    Robert Kirk Member

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    Okay thank you guys. Now for next question. I am in process of draining and replacing brake fluids. fluid in this thing looks nasty. Probably original. want to flush and replace along with new caliper and SS Lines. Question is, can I just use the DOT#5 (i think it is silicone) instead of the Dot #4 that is recommended? Also what brand pads you guys prefer? (WWW tires , would like minimal dust)
    Fatboy128 likes this.
  8. Lucifer

    Lucifer Well-Known Member

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    Your Evo left the factory with Dot5,so I'd stick with it. Dot 4 and Dot 5 can't be mixed,bad juju can happen if it is.Actually Dot 3-4 and 5.1 can't be mixed with Dot 5
    Here's a little info on the different types of brake fluid,my preference is Dot 5,mostly because it doesn't absorb moisture and won't ruin your paint if spilled like the others will.
    https://www.hemmings.com/blog/2013/...different-about-them-and-why-should-you-care/
    I'm using the same pads as you right now,Lyndall Z+
  9. Robert Kirk

    Robert Kirk Member

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    Thanks for all your help guys. What I did was - drained out all the old fluid (bike been sitting 4-years) and it was really nasty, original fluid (original owner said he never changed it). Cleaned up master cylinder & caliper. Installed new Lyndall Gold Plus pads. Installed new Russel SS Braided Line. Filled & Bleed with Bel-Ray DOT #5. Going to try that 1st. Now onto the rear brake and going to do the same thing. Already has a much firmer feel on the handle. If after 1st test ride I am still not happy, going to go with the 4- Piston caliper.
    Red Rider likes this.

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