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Big Blue Bike Lift....Lift Threads Question

Discussion in 'Projects' started by NeilP, Mar 9, 2010.

  1. NeilP

    NeilP Active Member

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    Anone got one. or know of someone that has one of these?

    Eazy Rizer Big Blue Motorcycle Lift

    They are a bit expensive, but I like the look of them so was thinking of building myself one.
    It is just knowing the spec of the lift thread. it is probably going to have to be the buttress wall/square/Acme thread type thread, but I was wondering about thread pitch, material/grade etc.

    I would imagine the rod is about 3/4 inch Diameter...I think I read that the drive socket on the top is 22mm socket size, and the thread diameter looks about that or a little less.

    Anyone got access to one of these, and can you have a look at the thread for me.

    Cheers

    Neil
  2. hotroadking

    hotroadking Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Saw it at Daytona Bike Week last weekend.

    Looks good had a big ol bagger up on it

    I don't see $595 in value but it's low production so high costs.

    Pretty neat gets the bike up high enough to detail the transmission pan LOL
  3. NeilP

    NeilP Active Member

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    Did you get a picture of it? the threaded area in particular?
  4. hotroadking

    hotroadking Super Moderator Staff Member

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    No I have a big bike lift from Kendon and a Sears floor jack...

    the threaded part IIRC was a very very long threaded rod, coarse thread, on the end they had welded a 1 inch or 3/4 inch nut, you take your electric drill, put on the nut and raise and lower the jack using the threaded rod...

    At $600 US it was neat but not for me.
  5. hotroadking

    hotroadking Super Moderator Staff Member

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  6. NeilP

    NeilP Active Member

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    Thanks, for taking the time to find those pics for me, but I have seen them before.

    What I am trying to find is a detailed picture showing the thread itself.
    I have been looking at all sorts of threads Acme, UNC UNF Metric etc but am not sure what type to go for..Needs to be something that has enough strength to support a lot of weight, while still being able to turn easily enough with 'relatively' little effort...if it can be turned with an electric drill. So i was thinking of a fairly fine thread with a large number of TPI ...but then what about the strength of the thread.

    So trying to find out the exact thread type that is used.
  7. FLHTbiker

    FLHTbiker Moderator Staff Member

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  8. chucktx

    chucktx Moderator Staff Member

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    swap the threaded rod for a hydraulic ram...........use a pully at the top, use the ram to pull a cable over the pully, lifting the support..
  9. chucktx

    chucktx Moderator Staff Member

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    just saw the harbor freight one.....looks good!!!
  10. NeilP

    NeilP Active Member

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    Yes, that is a nice design, but now I have sen the other Big Blue one, really like that...small and compact when not needed, and you can get much closer to the bike when it is in the air.

    As you say, I could do the job with a hydraulic ram/pulley arrangement, I have spare ones and a combined 12v pump/reservoir unit kicking around somewhere, but the thread idea is good. Simple, no locks required while up and less to go wrong...oil leaks etc, no battery required etc.
  11. hotroadking

    hotroadking Super Moderator Staff Member

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    well if they are around here this summer at Leesburg I'll get a shot but that's a few months away...
  12. hotroadking

    hotroadking Super Moderator Staff Member

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    From Web Bike World Review

    Looks like ACME

    The work of lifting and lowering the motorcycle is performed by an Acme-type threaded rod, which is located on the right side of the vertical upright in Photo 1 (below). The threaded rod holds the motorcycle at any distance along its length, and the manufacturer claims that no locking devices are necessary to hold the bike in place.

    The threaded rod is rotated with a 22 mm hex nut on top. A 1/2" square drive drill adapter is supplied with the lift, which allows a heavy-duty, high-torque cordless drill to be used to raise and lower the bike.

    Our cordless 8.4 Volt drill doesn't have the guts for this job, so we ended up using a 22 mm socket and a ratchet wrench to turn the screw by hand. This works well and, we think, is safer because it gives the operator a better "feel" for what's happening as the bike is lifted and more warning if the bike isn't balanced properly.
  13. NeilP

    NeilP Active Member

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    That would be great, a couple of shots of the thread, and maybe a dimension or two, OD threads per inch etc. Another useful measurement would be the angle of the upright, from what I have seen, it seems to be angled backwards a bit, away from the bike.

    No hurry, I have a small parallelogram lift already on order, but really like the look of this one
  14. jarhed

    jarhed New Member

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    Give me your email address and I'll send you several pics of my big blue lift. I got a great deal on it last year from a guy who needed cash. I have several pics.....
  15. chucktx

    chucktx Moderator Staff Member

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    that is great jarhed!!!
  16. NeilP

    NeilP Active Member

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    Yes, that is great. Thanks

    I have sent you a PM

    Neil
  17. hotroadking

    hotroadking Super Moderator Staff Member

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    how about I just get you the engineers final drafts LOL
  18. NeilP

    NeilP Active Member

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    No need ;) I have got the pics, and the info I need now. The design on the rest of it is not all that important, but finding the sort of thread they were using was the important bit.

    Seems to be only half inch diameter, 9 threads per inch and definitely a square form type thread. The standard spec for American Standard General Purpose Acme Thread is half inch and 10 threads per inch, so it is probably not standard Acme thread, but that is not important, I think it is probably the metric Trapezoidal thread type

    I was worried about using a thread of too coarse a pitch and then find the torque required to lift that sort of weight was too great.

    Thinking possibly Trapezoidal Fine Thread DIN 103 Tr 22 x 3 mm
    http://www.gewinde-normen.de/en/trapezoidal-fine-thread.html
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2010
  19. hotroadking

    hotroadking Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I would bet metric, and the arm does slant back a bit but I couldn't tell you the angle...

    Sounds like a good project for you though...
  20. NeilP

    NeilP Active Member

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    OK, I know I am getting obsessed by the thread thing, but that is key to it all. Get that wrong and it will be a pig to lift.
    The rest looks fairly basic. A slight slant back, a decent height of carriage unit and some decent rollers and that can all be done quite quickly......once started...

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