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Lost Coast Run

Discussion in 'Trips N' Trails - the ride is the adventure' started by Red Rider, Jul 25, 2019.

  1. Red Rider

    Red Rider Well-Known Member

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    Lost Coast Tree.jpg I finally made the run from here in Nevada out through to the Coast on California Hwy 36 once I got to Susanville. I took Hwy 36 to the 101, but called it a day's ride once I found a motel in Fortuna. That was a ride of over 400 miles, lots of twists, 6,000 ft or so of elevation change and 47F degrees in temperature swing.

    Hwy 36 is not fully re-paved, yet, out in Trinity county....and since the highway is closed from 8am to 5pm daily for repairs, I did some detouring on roads through the marijuana farms that was VERY aromatic. I think I like dead skunk smell better. Sorry, just not into the weed.
    badinfluence63 likes this.
  2. Red Rider

    Red Rider Well-Known Member

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    This was on Hwy 199 heading up into Oregon........if you want better photos, I recommend do the ride and take 'em yourself!:p Forest Bike.jpg
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  3. Red Rider

    Red Rider Well-Known Member

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    I returned from the ride up the coast from Fortuna to Crescent City via Grant's Pass, Oregon, then I-5 to Dunsmuir, CA, where I spent the night. The next morning I rode I-5 to Red Bluff and back on to Hwy 36. The highway really does look different when ya go the other direction.
    badinfluence63 and JohnnyBiker like this.
  4. JohnnyBiker

    JohnnyBiker Well-Known Member

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    Any idea when 36 will be at full strength?
  5. Red Rider

    Red Rider Well-Known Member

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    There were at least three full sections of road completely tore up, but the big slow-down looks to be that they're just starting to put in a bridge for a section. Maybe done by early 2020?

    Frankly, I want to take Hwy 299 next time. Goes right through the famous little-Bigfoot town of Willow Creek. If ya haven't heard about that, just do the search on it. I did have to dodge deer on Hwy 36 - and a fox and skunk - maybe a sasquatch on 299?:D
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  6. badinfluence63

    badinfluence63 Well-Known Member

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    Hey now RR, Thanks for the pictures. Strange looking tree. Looks like it grew blowing in the wind? Bike run like a champ?
  7. Red Rider

    Red Rider Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, cypress trees like this one are common along the West coast. The old ones, like this one is, tend to flatten out and bend along the prevailing wind direction. Look close and you'll see this is taken from a bluff overlooking the southern portion
    of Humboldt Bay. with the jetty separating the Pacific Ocean from the bay visible on the left, in the distance.
    The Heritage does run like a dream. Speed, power, maneuverability perfect for my riding. I dragged the pegs/floorboards on corners a few times, but tried to avoid that because I didn't want sparks to cause any wildfires - many of the areas I traveled were hit hard by wildfires, including the Camp fire, but there was still plenty of tinder left to ignite, if not careful. In the wet, green area of Hwy 199 (second pic) there was no risk, so I did as much tight cornering at speed as I could. A bit exciting, especially when the road was along cliff face - which was frequent. Throwing the bike left & right through the corners was real exercise, from which I am almost recovered! Traffic was light on the weekday I rode, but I was told weekend traffic can be brutally slow.
  8. Red Rider

    Red Rider Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    Looking up on Hwy 199
  9. hotroadking

    hotroadking Super Moderator Staff Member

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    That would be a great area to ride, I've done part of it back in the 80's when
    I lived out there in my Supra... That was pre big motorcycle, my little GS400
    would have been fun in the twisties but hell getting there...

    If it wasn't for the crazy Californians I'l liked living in CA... LOL
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  10. Red Rider

    Red Rider Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    Road was so empty I had time to park and take this picture - maybe 'cuz the Ewoks and Stormtroopers on speeder bikes don't use roads?
  11. Red Rider

    Red Rider Well-Known Member

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    Oh, I forgot to add that the reason you don't see anything packed on the bike is I managed to travel for days with just what I could wear & fit in the saddlebags. Not that amazing, really, but a first for me on a long wander. Since I had no sleeping bag or tent, I had to get a roof over my head each night - which isn't as easy as you'd think when one goes to summer tourist destination areas - but I have to say I am glad to not have to camp anymore.

    Since I had no cooking gear. either, I ate at diners (no chains, please), too. To keep from getting too lethargic (and any fatter), I generally only ate once per day. The first day, only I lunched at Castellanos in Hayfork - really good, if not exceptional, and a plenty of it pork tostada. Dinner was a glass of Twenty Three barleywine at Fortuna's Eel River Brewing Company - the food looked good, but I was stuffed from lunch. The next day, I hit The Chart Room in Crescent City and had a great bouillabaisse that really warmed me up after the cool, meandering morning ride from Arcata. Prices were pretty reasonable, too, considering the quality and compared to other places nearby.
    The only other meal of note was a breakfast burrito at the Wheelhouse in Dunsmuir, CA. Since it was at a place that clearly caters to the organic crowd, the food cost way more than the measly portion should have - but I will say it was really good.

    My trip to the Lost Coast was largely a recon to see if it would be worth driving out there later this year or so with my wife. The scenery and The Chart Room make it a must-do, even though I'll have to be in a cage to bring her out (she ain't up to the +1,000 mile round trip it is on a bike). This way I won't have to only wish I could ride the roads out there: I can remember riding them....and then ride 'em again, at another time. :cigar:
  12. badinfluence63

    badinfluence63 Well-Known Member

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    Ya camping sux. Nothing better than a soft bed and AC after a long hot day riding in the sun.

    We always get hotels with free breakfast than snack on home made jerky till get hotel and dinner. Free breakfasts are pretty good with choices of eggs,toast, bacon,waffles, bisquits and gravy etc...

    You live in a great location.
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