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Shovel top end . . .

Discussion in 'Motorcycle Tech Talk' started by joshbob, Oct 16, 2012.

  1. Lucifer

    Lucifer Well-Known Member

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    The 30-60-30 method is good to seat rings...in 3rd gear accelerate from 30MPH to 60MPH,then engine brake back down to 30MPH, accelerate back to 60MPH....Do that 10-12 times and rings should be seated...
  2. Tommyc

    Tommyc Active Member

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    Congrats, JB.
    I wouldn't be in 3rd gear at 30 mph with a four speed. I think that would lug the motor too much.
    I would follow the S&S described method of breaking in new rings. The instructions are on their website.
  3. joshbob

    joshbob Well-Known Member

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    I think you're right. Anyway, varying speeds for several rides, without lugging, should do the trick.

    I will look into S&S's instructions, thanks.
  4. Lucifer

    Lucifer Well-Known Member

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    That's the key,vary speeds without lugging the engine....
  5. Tommyc

    Tommyc Active Member

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    FYI.
    Varying speed/rpm's helps the engine keep the oil pumped up. The most important thing is to not overheat the engine. Break-in the rings slow and easy.
  6. joshbob

    joshbob Well-Known Member

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    I suppose that's so the rings won't lose their temper? Don't want 'em getting mad at me :rolleyes:. I'm glad I put good quality Hastings rings in this time.
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2013
  7. joshbob

    joshbob Well-Known Member

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    Took the first ride yesterday. It was 48 out. Brrrr. Took a while to get 'er started, but once it fired it was good to go. Problem was, I had no rear brake; didn't find that out until I got out on the road. Being how that's the only brake I have, you can imagine my concern! Also, the tranny didn't want to shift very well, up or down. Grinding sound when downshifting - yikes! So I really didn't come to a stop until I feathered the ol' thang up the ramp and into my shop. Interesting day . . .

    Only rode a mile or two. When I got back I saw that the brake fluid level was a bit low in the master cylinder so I topped it off. There were no leaks in the line or at any of the connectors. Pedal still goes almost all the way down. Maybe there's air in the line? The tranny problem could have been that the oil hadn't warmed up sufficiently? Using 85/140 gear oil - mighty thick at 48 degrees.

    Will check the clutch adjustment today. Don't understand how it could go out of adjustment just sitting around a few months. It was perfect before teardown last October.
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
  8. Lucifer

    Lucifer Well-Known Member

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    Nothing gets the heart pumping like a brake pedal going all the way down eh...must be a little seepage somewhere,shouldn't loose fluid in a sealed system....bleed it and keep an eye on it...
    LOL 85-140 in 48* be like trying to lube the gears with tar....
  9. prodrag1320

    prodrag1320 Active Member

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    really doubt is the trans fluid,depending on what plates youve got,their probley just a little stuck together from sitting.either take the clutch apart & clean the plates or just see if it goes away riding it
  10. Fatboy128

    Fatboy128 Well-Known Member

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    Air in brake lines usually creates a spongy feeling pedal. If the pedal is going all the way down, and there isn't any leakage from the system the master cylinder (brake cylinder) may have blow-by in the piston seal.
  11. cardboard

    cardboard Well-Known Member

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  12. joshbob

    joshbob Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it's time to either rebuild the master or buy a new one. The one I have came with the roller - and you know how reliable everything else was, right? NOT!! :gah: :D
  13. Tommyc

    Tommyc Active Member

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    Find out where it's leaking from first.
    It could be a line, the caliper or a fitting.
    Or maybe someone is trying to bump you off by draining your brake fluid without your knowledge.
    Has your wife increased your life insurance recently? :roflmao:
  14. Fatboy128

    Fatboy128 Well-Known Member

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    A leak out of a line etc. would be apparent (providing Josh ain't blind!) My money is on the brake cylinder. One of my sons had it go on his older bike recently. Drove him crazy until I told him to replace the cylinder and he did.
  15. joshbob

    joshbob Well-Known Member

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    There are NO VISIBLE LEAKS in the brake lines or connectors. I would like to rebuild my master cylinder, but I'm not certain what year bike it originally came off of. It appears from pictures that it came off a 2000-07 Softail. A rebuild kit is only $15 as opposed to a brand new master cylinder for $100 to $135. I also have a brake cylinder hone, so I could do the job myself. I did all the wheel cylinders on my Chevy step van years ago and they never leaked.
  16. Fatboy128

    Fatboy128 Well-Known Member

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    My old automobile home wouldn't fit but if yours does that's the way to go.
  17. charlie46

    charlie46 Well-Known Member

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    JMO but, You put a lot of trust in having only a rear brake. Remember the really 'Old Skool' choppers had a mechanicle rear brake,read:less likely to fail. Again JMO
  18. Lucifer

    Lucifer Well-Known Member

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  19. Lucifer

    Lucifer Well-Known Member

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    :roflmao:less likely to stop you too;) I'd rather have a hydraulic disc brake over a mechanical drum brake any day...
  20. Lucifer

    Lucifer Well-Known Member

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